Olympian Lindsey Vonn’s mother dies a year after ALS diagnosis: ‘A shining light that will never fade’

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Retired ski racer Lindsey Vonn announced on Saturday that her mother, Linda Lindy Anne Lund, had died after losing her year-long battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Lund died Thursday night, a year to the day after her ALS diagnosis, Vonn said.

“My sweet mother Lindy lost her battle with ALS,” Vonn wrote in an Instagram post. “She passed away peacefully as I held her hand, exactly one year after her diagnosis. I am so grateful for every moment I spent with her, but I am also grateful that she is no longer in pain and that she be in peace. She was a shining light that will never fade and I will always be inspired by her.”

Vonn’s post included a photo gallery of the two of them.

LINDSEY VONN SHARES SPECIAL MESSAGE FOR ALS MOTHER: ‘WE CELEBRATE YOU EVERY DAY’

Ski racer Lindsey Vonn announced on Saturday that her mother, Linda Lindy Anne Lund, had died after losing her year-long battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
(Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for P&G Thank You Mom)

The Olympic gold medalist’s post also featured an excerpt from her memoir which she said was “sadly appropriate”.

“This book is dedicated to my mother,” reads the excerpt. “She’s my inspiration not because of what she’s done for my skiing career, but how her perpetual positivity has made me who I am, and more importantly, off the slopes.”

“Every adversity I encountered, I found in it perspective and inspiration,” the excerpt continues. “Throughout the many hardships of her life, they have made her stronger, kinder and more humble. That kind of courage is what has shaped me since I was a child; whether I know it or not, I know it now.”

Vonn had made an Instagram post in July celebrating her mother’s strength and resilience a year after her initial diagnosis. The post also included several photos of the two.

“Since I had a stroke giving birth to me, my mother is the picture of strength and more specifically of resilience,” Vonn wrote at the time. “She always gave me the willpower to keep fighting whenever I had an injury or an obstacle in skiing and in life. Now she exudes that resilience more than ever before. There are good and bad days, but every day we have with her is a beautiful day.”

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Vonn had made an Instagram post in July celebrating her mother's strength and resilience.  The post also included several photos of the mother and daughter.

Vonn had made an Instagram post in July celebrating her mother’s strength and resilience. The post also included several photos of the mother and daughter.
(Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for P&G Thank You Mom)

The ski racer said her family came together to help Lund, which “has been a testament to the person and mother she is.”

Vonn explained that her family kept the situation a secret, but her mother wanted to show her battle with ALS to raise awareness.

“I will do my best to honor her and raise awareness for ALS. We love you mom and we celebrate you everyday,” Vonn wrote.

In June, Vonn was inducted into the United States Olympic and Paralympic Hall of Fame and dedicated her acceptance speech to her mother.

In June, Vonn was inducted into the United States Olympic and Paralympic Hall of Fame and dedicated her acceptance speech to her mother.

In June, Vonn was inducted into the United States Olympic and Paralympic Hall of Fame and dedicated her acceptance speech to her mother.
(Photo by Mitchell Gunn/Getty Images)

“She taught me so much about strength and character and it was because of the example my mom set that I was able to overcome every obstacle that was thrown at me. Thank you mom,” said Vonn.

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ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a rare neurological condition that affects the nerve cell responsible for controlling voluntary muscle movement, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

The disease is incurable, but there are treatments that can help relieve and control some symptoms.

Naomi C. Amerson